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Posts Tagged ‘Science’

Canada To Measure Marijuana Use By Testing Sewage

In Canada, Health, International, marijuana, News, NPR, Science on April 13, 2018 at 5:47 pm


In an effort to track cannabis consumption more closely, the Canadian government has instructed Statistics Canada, Canada’s national statistical agency, to analyze sewage waste from about a quarter of Canada’s total 36 million inhabitants. In hopes to estimate how much cannabis Canadians consume, in total, through the sewage measurements. But the route from a wastewater treatment plant to that kind of calculation gets really murky really fast, such as: “The suburban users, are they peeing in the city but consuming in the suburbs?”…read the full story here.

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Gluttony useful response to scarcity

In Food, Health, NPR on February 2, 2013 at 2:06 pm

An evolutionary look at why, in times of economic hardship, we may be “hard-wired” to eat foods higher in fat and calories – even though we know better. Read more here.

[nytimes.com]

[nytimes.com]

“Evolutionary biologists have long speculated that in prehistoric times, when the blueprint of modern human behavior was created as our ancestors struggled for survival, gluttony may have been a useful response to scarcity: If you knew — or feared — a famine was coming, it made sense to tuck away as many calories as possible to prepare for it.”

Predicting Lifespan Based on Size

In Health, Nature, NPR, Science on January 23, 2013 at 2:36 am

A fascinating conversation with physicist Geoffrey West about the mathematics of lifespan. “Life is short for small creatures, longer in big ones. So algae die sooner than oak trees; elephants live longer than mayflies, but you know that. Here’s the surprise: There is a mathematical formula which says if you tell me how big something is, I can tell you — with some variation, but not a lot — how long it will live.”

[Courtesy of Yunfun Tan]

[Courtesy of Yunfun Tan]

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[Courtesy of Yunfun Tan / npr.org]

Intelligence in the Human-Machine

In Chicago, NPR, Pop Culture, WBEZ on January 11, 2013 at 5:37 pm
cello

Photo courtesy of David Dehann / wbez.org

Chicago Symphony Orchestra cellist Katinka Kleijn duetting with her own brain this weekend at the Chicago Cultural Center.

Read.

Information on the free performance.